According to theguardian.com, mental arithmetic bulks up brain muscle far more than any quick-fingered exercise on a PlayStation. Ryuta Kawashima of Tohuku University used brain scanners to watch what happened in children’s heads as they played computer games, and as they did simple arithmetical exercises. Nintendo games kept busy the parts of the brain associated with vision and movement. But even simple mathematical operations stimulated activity in both left and right hemispheres of the frontal lobe. This challenged received wisdom, which reserves the left hemisphere of the brain for methodical stuff like maths, and the right hemisphere for so-called creative thinking. He tested his results both with magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography, and went on to show that addition and subtraction actually did more for growing brains than listening to music or listening to text read aloud. SumQuest is an addition-based game designed with the aim of boosting mental maths ability. Given the positive feedback received from the open testing of the SumQuest mobile game app, I’ve launched a kickstarter campaign with the aim of finishing the outstanding versions of SumQuest with your assistance. Please visit https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/sumquest/sumquest-mobile-game-app?ref=discovery&term=sumquest for more details regarding the campaign. SumQuest is available for open testing from the Apple iStore https://testflight.apple.com/join/UNf24It8 and from the Google Play Store  https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.happytum.sumquest. Please note that all SumQuest features are free in open testing.